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Facebook has suspended the data analytics firm that the Trump campaign relied on during the 2016 election, saying the firm improperly received user data and then may have failed to get rid of it.

On Friday, the social media giant announced that Cambridge Analytica; parent company Strategic Communication Laboratories; Christopher Wylie, who helped found Cambridge Analytica; and U.K.-based professor Aleksandr Kogan were all barred from Facebook pending an investigation.

In accordance with tradition, the Chicago River was dyed green Saturday morning in honor of St. Patrick's Day. According to The Chicago Tribune, Richard J. Daley, who served as Chicago's mayor from 1955 until his death in 1976, initially proposed dyeing part of Lake Michigan green instead. His friend Stephen M.

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We talk with members of Uncle Dad's Art Collective about their major production coming up at Chico State's Laxson Auditorium -- "The Songs of Stevie Wonder." We also talk with artist Molly Amick about her magic-realist collages on mythic themes. Her art is now on display at Chico's Beatniks Coffee House.


The Chico State Research Foundation Board of Directors, the governing board of North State Public Radio, will hold an NSPR Board Meeting on Monday, March 12 at 11:45 AM in Bell Memorial Union, Room 210 on the Chico State campus 400 West 1st Street, Chico, California. Community members are welcome to attend. 

Click here for radio station public information, including independent audits and the FCC Public File.

Sea level rise and eclipse phenomena highlight this episode. First Dave talks to NASA Oceanographer Josh Willis about two new studies. The first reports that sea level rise isn't increasing at a linear rate -- it is accelerating. The second study demonstrates how much our understanding of ice melt from Antarctica's glaciers has advanced in just the past few years. Then we revisit The Great American Eclipse of 2017 with Dr. Gordon Telepun. A plastic surgeon from Alabama, Telepun created the smart phone app Solar Eclipse Timer. His YouTube channel by the same name (as the app) features detailed explanations of the varied and amazing phenomena associated with total solar eclipses.


Photo used courtesy Jason Dewees


This week on Cultivating Place, Designing with Palms – in the heart of Spring Break season where those of us in colder climates might be longing for a warm, sunny, palm punctuated beach, we dig into this remarkable plant family and get above and beyond its symbolism and closer to its truer history and essence.

Wayne Hsieh

This week we add another woman’s perspective to the story of life in California’s gold camps. An everyday perspective. Of the very few women who made up gold-rush communities, most were not notorious—definitely not internationally notorious, like “Spanish dancer” Lola Montez—but just plain folks, doing their best to get food on the table and keep a roof over their heads. 

In her latest book, New York Times best-selling author Miriam Horn looks at conservation in America through the livelihood of five American families. She works for the Environmental Defense Fund and will be in Chico this Friday, March 2nd at the Sierra Nevada Brewery. This week join Nancy for a conversation with the author of Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman: Conservation Heroes of the American Heartland.


"The discussion about climate change can seem a little bit abstract sometimes. My question is: are there observable phenomena in our area that scientists can confidently attribute to climate change?" - Ken, Chico 

That’s a great question and one that perhaps is harder to answer definitively than at first glance. Science has a pretty high bar for declarative statements. That’s pretty much why gravity and evolution are often referred to as theories.

Now, we obviously lack polar ice caps or sea levels here in interior Northern California — the items typically measured, mentioned and argued over — but there are plenty of natural systems locally, and people keeping tabs.

Agriculture is huge in the North State, as are rain, snow and migrating wildlife, not to mention temperature records dating back to the late 19th century.

Officials backing a massive public works project planned for the North State are firing back after a state body’s evaluation gave the proposed Sites Reservoir dismal scores.

Backers of Sites, along with 10 of the other 11 proposals have filed official appeals with the California Water Commission, the group charged with ranking proposals vying for $2.7 billion worth of voter approved bond money for new water storage. 

Only the Nevada Irrigation District and its proposed Centennial Dam on the Bear River declined to appeal. 

We visit the CUSD Center for the Arts to talk with the director and the star from the stage musical "42nd Street" produced by Chico's Inspire School of Arts and Sciences. We also visit Chico Art Center to hear from the gallery director about what exhibits and activities are in store at CAC in 2018.

In this week's episode Dave is joined by Nolan Ford for an in depth conversation with Jad Abumrad, host of WNYC's Radiolab which is one of public radio's most popular and innovative programs. Jad was fascinated with recording sounds from an early age and after pursuing a college education that concentrated both on writing and musical composition, he kind of stumbled into a career in radio reporting which led, eventually, to the fascinating storytelling soundscapes that make up Radiolab with his longtime cohost Robert Krulwich. Jad will be visiting Chico for a stage presentation on Innovation at Laxson Auditorium on March 3. Also in this episode, Dave talks to Christopher Potter about his new book The Earth Gazers. The book is an extensive history of the space program from its earliest beginnings in Russia with Konstantin Tsiolkovsky and America with Robert Goddard. Along the way he weaves Charles Lindbergh's little known influences on the nascent rocketry program in the U.S. and the complex story of German rocket scientist Werner von Braun who designed the giant rockets that hurtled American astronauts to the Moon during the Apollo Program. But a funny thing happened while trying to leave our planet, we discovered what it looked like to actually see our world from beyond. Dave and Christopher discuss how that has changed our world view, literally and figuratively!


With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects.

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