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Singer Rihanna denounced an ad that appeared on Snapchat making a game of domestic violence that featured photographs of her and Chris Brown. And the social media app's stock price went tumbling.

"Now SNAPCHAT I know you already know you ain't my fav app out there," Rihanna said in a statement posted Thursday on rival social media platform Instagram, where she has 61 million followers. "I'd love to call it ignorance, but I know you ain't that dumb! You spent money to animate something that would intentionally bring shame to DV victims and made a joke of it!!!"

A former Cornell University student has been charged with four federal crimes after an abundance of weapons was allegedly found in his Ithaca, N.Y., apartment.

Two of the charges have to do with possession of firearms — an unregistered destructive device and a silencer. The others have to do with false statements in connection with the acquisition of a firearm and the required record of a federal firearms license in connection with a firearm purchase.

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We visit Redding's Riverfront Playhouse to talk with directors and actors from "Jack of Diamonds," a comedy about a group of retirees who concoct a creative revenge against a con man. We also visit Chico's A Beautiful Life gallery to talk with featured artist Richard Whitehead about his colorful, often abstract paintings inspired by his travels to Santa Fe and Italy.


Before the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, the signature temblor in the Bay Area occurred on October 21, 1868. That rupture of a major fault, 150 years ago has drawn the attention of scientists concerned that a magnitude 6.5+ quake is due for the densely populated East Bay. Dave is joined by USGS Geophysicist Ken Hudnut as they interview two leading experts on the Hayward Fault: David Schwartz and Tom Brocher. It's a fascinating and frightening discussion of the "ticking seismic time bomb" beneath the East Bay.

Photo used courtesy of Maria Failla

Maria Failla is the host of Bloom & Grow Radio – a unique podcast from New York City designed specifically for indoor plant people, urban jungle dwellers, houseplant enthusiasts and succulent killers alike. This week on Cultivating Place Maria shares her journey of learning more about the care and keeping of her plants and herself. Join us! 

Death is an aspect of being human that is a taboo subject in our culture. In her latest book, Nevada City teacher and therapist Patt Lind-Kyle has advice for preparing for this inevitable transition. This week join Nancy for a conversation with the author of Embracing the End of Life: A Journey Into Dying & Awakening.

Photo by College Plus Coordinator, Doug Ferguson

“Hi. My name is Dan and I am a student at Chico State, and I also have Asperger's disorder. My question is, ‘What in Butte County is there for someone such as myself to have as a service here in Chico? That is to say what is available to me through scenarios to cope with any discrimination or misunderstanding?”

We visit two different theater venues in Chico to talk with directors and actors from two current productions: Chico State's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and Chico Theater Company's "9 to 5 the Musical."

In this episode we revisit two authors we interviewed in 2017. Jeff Goodell is the author of The Water Will Come, a sobering look at what lies ahead as the world's oceans expand and rise due to climate change. A contributing editor to Rolling Stone, the New York based writer was inspired to write the book in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which ravaged the East Coast with flooding in 2012, previewing what is certainly going to be a major and ongoing slow motion disaster in the near future. Goodell visits Miami Beach where the effects of sea level rise are already becoming a problem. Perhaps the most alarming chapter is about the U.S. Naval base at Norfolk one of the nation's most important defense installations that is likely to be abandoned in the next couple of decades. On a personal note, Dave also learned to his amazement that Goodell's mother is close friends with his neighbor, proving the adage that it is indeed, a small world, and one destined for major coastal changes no matter what actions we take to combat global warming in the near future.

In the second half of the show, Dave revisits his interview with Kathryn Miles, author of Quakeland: On The Road to America's Next Devastating Earthquake. Her book opens with a look at the tragic events following the Hebgen Lake earthquake of 1959 and takes readers on a a story that is part science and part travelogue as she journey's around the country investigating what scientists know, and more alarmingly don't know, about the ground beneath our feet. Miles travels into the bowels of the Earth in deep mines and the Hoover Dam in her search to understand how a devastating earthquake could have cataclysmic effects on the economy and infrastructure of the U.S. And not just in the seismically active west, but also on the east coast and midwest.


Photo used courtesy of Benjamin Vogt

Benjamin Vogt is a next generation student of the beloved conservationist and writer Aldo Leopold and a passionate nature and garden advocate himself. In his book “A New Garden Ethic: Cultivating Defiant Compassion For An Uncertain Future” he takes the essence of Leopold’s "A Land Ethic" and brings it home to our gardens in some surprising and sometimes challenging ways.

How do we conserve our valuable land and water resources? New York Times best-selling author Miriam Horn continues her look at conservation in America through the livelihood of five American families, and author Robert Glennon tells us what we can do about America's water crisis. This week join Nancy for conversations with two authors who wrote books about land and water conservation.

While both medicinal and recreational use of marijuana is legal in California – many communities are still not allowing the retail sale and distribution of it. Redding is about to become the second city in Shasta County that will. The decision came after a long and emotion-charged Redding City Council meeting Tuesday night. 

There were those who were in favor it and those who were opposed. Citizens voiced arguments ranging from "It's legal now. Smoke a joint. It cures reefer madness.” to “Each of you will violate 21 USC which is conspiracy to violate the federal narcotics act.”


With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects.

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