News

News

As the brewing trade war between the United States and China escalates, North State farmers are caught in the middle. Farmers like Bill Carriere, the CEO of Carriere Family Farms and a board member of the California Walnut Commission.

Carriere greeted me outside of his office and walnut processing facility near the small town of Glenn. In the parking lot, we watched as one of his employees loaded crates of walnuts into a semi-truck. Carriere said the truck will be driving these crates to the Port of Oakland. His company ships their walnuts to 25 different countries, including China.

Carriere Family Farms grows twelve different varieties of walnuts. They have orchards in Glenn, Butte and Colusa counties. They also buy walnuts from just under 100 other farms, all north of Sacramento and package the walnuts for global export at their processing facility.

USFWS Pacific Southwest Region / Flickr

California’s largest water district has given key support to a 17-billion-dollar water project, long sought by Governor Jerry Brown. The vote Tuesday would fund twin tunnels under the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, which will send water to Central and Southern California.

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California agreed to take on about two-thirds of the cost of the giant project. It calls for two forty-foot-wide, 35-mile-long pipes to extend under the Delta, carrying water from the northern end that can be pumped south and east.

The newly rebuilt Oroville spillway may get its first real test in coming days. The Department of Water Resources says it will open the spillway gates if the lake level rises beyond a certain point with the incoming storm. It would be the first time water is sent down the reconstructed concrete chute since the original broke apart during last year’s emergency.  

 

Adia White

“Hi, this is Fran Bart and my question is why are there roosters and chickens, lots of them, in the parking lot of Starbucks in Yuba City. It's a big parking lot, like a big mini mall and there's a Starbucks there. It's on Highway 99 in Yuba City, and so I'm just wondering why all those chickens and roosters are running around the parking lot there. Anyway, thank you very much. Bye.”

 

 


 

Mental health crisis counselors hit the streets alongside police in Chico for the first time Tuesday under an agreement with county officials.

Proud of the program but tempering expectations, Chico Police Chief Michael O’Brien said the teams aren’t a panacea. The teams won’t be available 24/7 nor are they a response to recent officer involved shootings O’Brien said.

Photo by College Plus Coordinator, Doug Ferguson

“Hi. My name is Dan and I am a student at Chico State, and I also have Asperger's disorder. My question is, ‘What in Butte County is there for someone such as myself to have as a service here in Chico? That is to say what is available to me through scenarios to cope with any discrimination or misunderstanding?”

While both medicinal and recreational use of marijuana is legal in California – many communities are still not allowing the retail sale and distribution of it. Redding is about to become the second city in Shasta County that will. The decision came after a long and emotion-charged Redding City Council meeting Tuesday night. 

There were those who were in favor it and those who were opposed. Citizens voiced arguments ranging from "It's legal now. Smoke a joint. It cures reefer madness.” to “Each of you will violate 21 USC which is conspiracy to violate the federal narcotics act.”

The Chico State Research Foundation Board of Directors, the governing board of North State Public Radio, will hold an NSPR Board Meeting on Monday, March 12 at 11:45 AM in Bell Memorial Union, Room 210 on the Chico State campus 400 West 1st Street, Chico, California. Community members are welcome to attend. 

Click here for radio station public information, including independent audits and the FCC Public File.

NASA

"The discussion about climate change can seem a little bit abstract sometimes. My question is: are there observable phenomena in our area that scientists can confidently attribute to climate change?" - Ken, Chico 

That’s a great question and one that perhaps is harder to answer definitively than at first glance. Science has a pretty high bar for declarative statements. That’s pretty much why gravity and evolution are often referred to as theories.

Now, we obviously lack polar ice caps or sea levels here in interior Northern California — the items typically measured, mentioned and argued over — but there are plenty of natural systems locally, and people keeping tabs.

Agriculture is huge in the North State, as are rain, snow and migrating wildlife, not to mention temperature records dating back to the late 19th century.

Officials backing a massive public works project planned for the North State are firing back after a state body’s evaluation gave the proposed Sites Reservoir dismal scores.

Backers of Sites, along with 10 of the other 11 proposals have filed official appeals with the California Water Commission, the group charged with ranking proposals vying for $2.7 billion worth of voter approved bond money for new water storage. 

Only the Nevada Irrigation District and its proposed Centennial Dam on the Bear River declined to appeal. 

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