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News

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Democratic candidate for governor Delaine Eastin wants to reduce California’s high poverty and incarceration by investing more in students.

Housing Special Full Audio

Jan 17, 2018

Through the reporting of NSPR’s News Team, you’ll hear about the current state of our region’s housing market, from people whose rent costs them most of what they bring home on their paycheck, from students who’ve struggled to find housing while they attend Chico State, from a once homeless veteran who now has a stable roof over her head, and from the wife of a farmworker who this holiday season had a place that she and her family could call their own. 

California energy commission

“My name is Nick and I’m from Chico. My question is, where does the power in Butte come from and how much of it comes from renewable sources?”

Like Nick, I also wondered where our energy comes from. When I run my washing machine, turn on the heater, or switch on the lights, it all seems to work like magic. But as miraculous as it all is, it’s of course not magic. The energy we use comes from a lot of different sources. For example, in the North State we have many dams that generate a form of energy called hydroelectric power. There are other ways to generate power too, like burning coal, oil or natural gas. You can even use heat from the magma beneath earth’s surface, which is called geothermal energy. 

An ice sculpture at the 13th annual Back-to-Session Bash, held at The Park nightclub just blocks from the California state Capitol in Sacramento on Thursday, January 11, 2018.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

An ice sculpture at the 13th annual Back-to-Session Bash, held at The Park nightclub just blocks from the California state Capitol in Sacramento on Thursday, January 11, 2018.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Gov. Jerry Brown presents his California budget proposal at the state Capitol on January 10, 2018.
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Gov. Jerry Brown presents his California budget proposal at the state Capitol on January 10, 2018.

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Gov. Jerry Brown was in full professor mode as he unveiled chart after giant chart on Wednesday morning inside the Capitol, laying out California’s financial situation and his plans for the coming year.

Before it got cold this winter, it was warm. Very warm. In fact, new data out Monday shows 2017 was the third warmest year recorded in the lower 48 states.

And it was also a smackdown year for weather disasters: 16 weather events each broke the billion-dollar barrier.

First, the heat. Last year was 2.6 degrees F warmer than the average year during the 20th century.

United Farm Workers President Arturo Rodriguez (left) embraces Asm. Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego) after the Assembly approved her AB 1066 on Monday, Aug. 29, 2016.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

United Farm Workers President Arturo Rodriguez (left) embraces Asm. Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego) after the Assembly approved her AB 1066 on Monday, Aug. 29, 2016.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

The latest proposal from a California lawmaker in response to the #MeToo and We Said Enough movements strikes at one of the Legislature's most sacred cows: the “at-will” employment of its staff.

In fact, Asm. Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher wants to give the Legislature’s more than 2,000 employees the right to unionize.

The California GOP delegation (center, Jim Brulte; right, Doug Ose) leads the fight for Donald Trump as the 2016 Republican National Convention erupts over a Rules debate.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

The California GOP delegation (center, Jim Brulte; right, Doug Ose) leads the fight for Donald Trump as the 2016 Republican National Convention erupts over a Rules debate.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

A third Republican has entered this year’s California governor’s race.

California's recreational pot law doesn't offer the complete freedom to buy, smoke or transport weed anywhere you please.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

From the looks of the “bathtub ring” around Lake Oroville, the vise of drought is quickly tightening around California’s neck. Fortunately, those looks are quite deceiving.

If you’ve had a gander recently at the largest state-owned reservoir in California, you’d might have a feeling of deja vu. It’s looking much like it did during the depths of the state’s recent drought.

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