Sarah Bohannon

Interim News Director

Sarah is one of the early birds of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition Monday through Wednesday. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah attended Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the university, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with being the station's interim news director, Sarah is the producer of the programs Cultivating Place, Up the Road and Common Ground for Common Good

Internation Dark-Sky Association

This week before the Winter Solstice, Cultivating Place is exploring and appreciating the many benefits and beauty of winter’s bountiful darkness – in our gardens and in our wildlands. Join us to listen to the conversation with Keith Ashley and Amanda Gormley of the International Dark-Sky Association, two passionate people within a global organization working to protect natural darkness as the precious natural resource it is.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr, Creative Commons

This week we visit Monterey’s Cannery Row and the world-class Monterey Bay Aquarium, which was among the first to recognize that by focusing on the local and very specific—in this case, the amazing sea life just offshore—aquariums could inspire people to appreciate oceans in general. Pretty darn smart. As Bill Nye the Science Guy says, this is the “coolest aquarium in the world.”

ChicoSol's mission is to provide cross-cultural feature-writing and bold investigative reporting in the Chico area of the Northern Sacramento Valley.

ChicoSol is a nonprofit news organization covering issues overlooked by traditional media that are starved for resources or intimidated by controversy, providing a digital platform and partnering with other outlets to distribute our work. Their stories cross cultural borders, including those related to race, ethnicity, immigration status, language and class, and examine how power and policy affect the most vulnerable communities.

This week on Cultivating Place we’re joined by gardener, author, activist and entomologist, Doug Tallamy. Ten years ago, his first book "Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in our Gardens," made clear how important our own home gardens and landscapes COULD be to improving the outlook for insects, birds and all other wildlife – indeed for the very future and health of our planet. Join us.

Mitchel Jones

We head up the road this week to Monterey Bay.

The only remembered line of the Ohlone people’s long-lost song of world renewal, “dancing on the brink of the world,” has a particularly powerful resonance at the edge of Monterey Bay. Here, in the unfriendly fog and ghostly cypress along the brink, the untamed coast, we know native people once danced. Yet like that ancient dance and its dancers, Monterey Bay largely remains a mystery: everything seen, heard, tasted, and touched only hints at what remains hidden.

The Siskiyou Child Care Council is a private, non-profit organization funded by the California Department of Education’s Early Education and Support Division and public/private grants. Since 1980, Siskiyou Child Care Council has provided child care and family resources to all of Siskiyou County. In the 2014-2015 fiscal year SCCC paid approximately $950,00 for child care and over $265,00 for preschool for children and families throughout Siskiyou County.

As we knock on the door of December, and the garden and its greenery call out to us in very different ways than they do in other seasons of the year, this week on Cultivating Place, we speak with British Gardener, Horticulturist and Floral designer Thomas Broom-Hughes of Thomas Bloom floristry and Petersham Nurseries. He has garden-gathered visions of luxurious winter beauty and traditions to share. Join us.

rocor / Flickr

Today we head up the road to Tor House, a striking hand-built stone home that harks back to a time when artists, photographers and other “seacoast bohemians” called Carmel home because it was beautiful, wild, isolated — not at all civilized enough for polite society. Not incidentally, it was also crazy-cheap.

Open-minded poets, writers and other oddballs were the community’s original movers and shakers, in fact — most of them shaken up and out of San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake. Robinson Jeffers, Upton Sinclair, Sinclair Lewis and Jack London were some of Carmel’s literary lights.

Chico Street Pastors are part of an international initiative first pioneered in the UK in 2003 that forms an inter-denominational Christian response to urban problems, engaging with people on the streets to care, listen and dialogue. The Chico Street Pastors come together to offer practical assistance to whomever they encounter while walking the downtown area from 10PM to 4AM, Friday and Saturdays.

J. Stephen Conn

We head up the road this week to Hearst Castle at San Simeon, which ranks right up there with Disneyland as one of California’s premier tourist attractions. Somehow that fact alone puts the place into proper perspective. Media magnate William Randolph Hearst’s castle is a rich man’s playground filled to overflowing with artistic diversions and other expensive toys, a monument to one man’s monumental self-importance and, some would say, equally impressive poor taste. A man for our times.

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