Sarah Bohannon

Reporter, Morning Edition Host

Sarah is the early bird of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition every weekday. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah came back to Butte County to attend Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the University, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with currently being NSPR’s weekday morning host, Sarah works as the station’s agriculture and health reporter too.   

J. Stephen Conn

We head up the road this week to Hearst Castle at San Simeon, which ranks right up there with Disneyland as one of California’s premier tourist attractions. Somehow that fact alone puts the place into proper perspective. Media magnate William Randolph Hearst’s castle is a rich man’s playground filled to overflowing with artistic diversions and other expensive toys, a monument to one man’s monumental self-importance and, some would say, equally impressive poor taste. A man for our times.

Lassen Park Foundation

The Lassen Park Foundation provides philanthropic support to preserve and interpret the special natural and cultural resources of Lassen Volcanic National Park and its environs for present and future generations.

The late autumn into winter months – from the Harvest Moon rising in October to the Winter Solstice on December 21st and through the beginning of the new calendar year, mark traditional seasons of gratitude, of giving thanks, and of offerings of generous service.

Photo by Henrique Pinto

We head up the road this week to Big Sur.

The poet Robinson Jeffers described this redwood and rock coast as “that jagged country which nothing but a falling meteor will ever plow.” So it’s fitting that this area was known as Jeffers Country long before it became Big Sur. Writer Henry Miller said Big Sur was “the face of the earth as the creator intended it to look,” a point hard to argue. Here, sandstone, granite, and the sundown sea crash together in an endless dance of creation and destruction.

Adia White

It’s been three days since the mass shooting in Rancho Tehama where five people were killed and 14 were injured by 43-year-old Kevin Janson Neal. During his shooting rampage, he targeted a local elementary school and officials recognize that swift response from the school’s staff saved many lives that day.

In California, there are no statewide specific active shooter regulations for schools other than that schools need to have a plan. It’s up to each school district to decide what that plan is and how to implement it, so school plans vary across the state.  

The right tools can make all the difference in our lives and in our work. This is as true in gardening as in all other aspects of life. This week on Cultivating Place we’re joined by Dorian Winslow, president of Womanswork. Almost 33 years ago now, Womanswork introduced the first work and garden gloves designed specifically for women. 

The North Valley InTune Music Foundation raises money for local public school music programs and inspire children to learn music and instruments. They also raise money for local foster children’s scholarships.

Among the garden ways that intrigue me – from my earliest memories to now, are those gardening ways we know about from the first peoples of the world. On Cultivating Place this week we’re joined by with Nick Hernandez, also known as Nick Hummingbird, an indigenous plantsman, educator and advocate from Southern California. His is a strong voice for the seasonal cycles of plants, peoples, and landscapes — for their food, utility, meaning and spirit. Join us!

Common Ground For Common Good: Save The Rain

Nov 7, 2017

Save the Rain teaches water starved communities in East Africa to use rain as a sustainable water supply, stopping the needless deaths caused by the global water crisis. To achieve our mission, we educate communities to harvest the rain through roof water collection and passive irrigation.

The 13th century Persian poet Rumi famously wrote: “Let the beauty you love be what you do, there are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.”

Ryland Engelhart and Finian Makepeace took these words to heart and in 2013 founded Kiss the Ground. Named in honor of the famed poem, Kiss the Ground works to restore soils worldwide by promoting and developing models that accelerate the adoption of regenerative agriculture — large scale and home scale. Healthy soil has the miraculous ability to sequester carbon from the atmosphere, and it’s not just carbon storage; the ways that soil stands to positively impact lives of billions worldwide are tangible and immediate: Clean water. Healthy food. Drought resistance. Restored habitats. 

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