Nolan Ford

Music Director, Producer, Midday Host

Nolan Ford is the Music Director for North State Public Radio. After graduating with a Media Arts degree from Chico State University in 2004, he accepted a part-time position with Sierra Nevada Brewing Company. The job's flexible scheduling presented Nolan with the opportunity to travel and perform music all across the West Coast with his first rock band, the secret stolen. A love of the arts bloomed into an obsession. Following five glorious years with SNBC, Nolan returned to CSUC and received a mathematics teaching credential in 2009. After several years of teaching middle and high school math, he accepted a position as Managing Editor for Chico arts/entertainment weekly, The SynthesisCurrently, Nolan can be heard on-air as the local midday host for NSPR, and also produces several programs for the station including Blue Dot, Nancy's Bookshelf, and Songs From Studio C. In his spare time, Nolan continues to travel and perform with various musical projects.

As Nancy's Bookshelf enters its 11th year on North State Public Radio, we hear from two of Nancy's early guests. Both were Chico State professors at the time — one since retired, and the other is now a newly-appointed dean. This week join Nancy for a conversation with author Kate McCarthy, and celebrate Bastille Day with wine expert Marian Baldy.

Josh Willis has business cards that his wife made for him. His job title? "Idiot Leftist Scientist." Dave finds out why in this fun and fascinating interview with Willis, who was honored by President Obama with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2009. A NASA/JPL Oceanographer and climate scientist, Josh uses comedy and improvisational skills honed in theater classes and at workshops from the Second City Comedy group to help him bridge the gap with people who are skeptical of climate science. Find out about OMG -- it's not what you think...as well as the adventures of Dick Dangerfield and Guy Scientist (with half hearted apologies to Garrison Keillor) in this light hearted look at a heavy subject -- climate change.

Photo by Pat McCaslin

Last weekend the Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival kicked off its 7th season in Hyampom, California. NSPR sent Nolan Ford to learn about the annual concert series and what North State residents can expect in the coming weeks.  

photo by Rob Eves

Today we’re joined by Los Angeles indie-rock band TV Heads. Before relocating from Northern California to pursue music full-time in LA, lead singers Sean Galloway and Angelica Tavella were already well-known for their past musical projects. Tavella performed for years under the name Nyx, and founded the Oakland record label OIM Records. Galloway’s prior band The Shimmies is beloved by many here in Chico, and he went on to write songs under the name Ave Grave. While on tour together with their solo projects, Tavella and Galloway realized it made more sense to just start a band together. 

Author and photographer Douglas Keister has a new book of architecture, Storybook Style: America's Whimsical Homes of the 1920s, which features five homes in Chico. He also writes novels, and his latest, The Sleepy Hollow Mystery, is the third in his Chick Corbett series. This week join Nancy for a conversation with prolific author Douglas Keister.

In this episode, Dave talks to Dr. Gordon Telepun. An Alabama plastic surgeon, Gordon's other passion is chasing eclipses. Based on his experiences with eclipse photography in Africa, Gordon saw the need to develop an eclipse timing device and did it himself. Now he has taken that concept and turned it into an app for both iPhones and Android devices. It lets you know when significant events are going to happen from wherever you are along the eclipse path using GPS. It is designed to help rather than distract you -- you rarely have to do anything with the phone other than wake it up. Then Gordon's voice let's you know what to look for and when! But better than the app itself is Gordon's infectious enthusiasm about the Great American Eclipse coming on August 21.

  

North Korea is frequently in the news these days, but how much do we know about our history with this country during the early 1950s? On the anniversary of the start of the Korean War, two local authors offer their perspectives: historian James Matray because he studied it; and Alan Guzzetti because he lived it. This week join Nancy for a look back at this forgotten war.

In this week's episode, Dave talks with Kate Fullam, the communications director for The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. It's a completely unscripted and natural conversation about her work at the center in general and The Flame Challenge in particular. The Flame Challenge is designed for scientists to create a four-minute video or write a short essay on a theme. This year's was "What is Energy?" What makes the contest so unique is that the contestants have to be scientists and they have to make their content accessible to an 11-year-old. And guest what? Eleven-year-olds also judge the contest!

Photo by Kristijan Lozic

Today we’re joined by alt-rock troubadour, Cygne. Although Laura Meyer is based out of Santa Cruz, it seems rare that you’ll ever actually find her there. After ten years of studying violin, Meyer set out on her first solo European tour and has been out on the road ever since. Her experiences abroad ended up leading to much of the inspiration behind her latest album, Let It Breathe. 

The latest book by Anderson author Bob Madgic is Ebby's Tale, the uplifting story of a rescued dog's journey from a shelter to the musical stage. Former Orland teacher Jane King illustrated her book about a fox in their family. This week join Nancy for a conversation with the authors of two books about canine family members.

Pages