Nolan Ford

Music Director, Producer, Midday Host

Nolan Ford is the Music Director for North State Public Radio. After graduating with a Media Arts degree from Chico State University in 2004, he accepted a part-time position with Sierra Nevada Brewing Company. The job's flexible scheduling presented Nolan with the opportunity to travel and perform music all across the West Coast with his first rock band, the secret stolen. A love of the arts bloomed into an obsession. Following five glorious years with SNBC, Nolan returned to CSUC and received a mathematics teaching credential in 2009. After several years of teaching middle and high school math, he accepted a position as Managing Editor for Chico arts/entertainment weekly, The SynthesisCurrently, Nolan can be heard on-air as the local midday host for NSPR, and also produces several programs for the station including Blue Dot, Nancy's Bookshelf, and Songs From Studio C. In his spare time, Nolan continues to travel and perform with various musical projects.

Author and pilgrim Annie O'Neil is the director/producer of a documentary about a man named Phil who dreamed of walking the 500-mile pilgrimage across Spain to Santiago. This week join Nancy for a conversation with two local pilgrims and the author of Everyday Camino with Annie.

For the debut episode of our new hour-long Blue Dot format, Dave talks to David Alvarado and Jason Sussberg, the filmmakers behind Bill Nye: Science Guy. The film ambitiously follows Nye over the course of a year as he debates creationist Ken Ham and takes on climate change denier Joe Bastardi. The film takes us on a journey from the persona that was created on the iconic Bill Nye The Science Guy television series to the man behind the bowtie. Find out what it was like to be in the whirlwind that is the life of one of America's most popular science communicators. 

In his weekly column "Biblio File," Chico Enterprise-Record book reviewer Dan Barnett has been featuring works by local authors for 30 years. This week join Nancy and Barnett for a look back at the books of 2017 by North State writers.

A recent meta-analysis revealed that calcium supplements confer no protection against bone fractures. In his book, Building Bone Vitality, Michael Castleman describes what does protect our bones. In Often Overlooked, local poet J.E. Mathews journeys through her memories of childhood to middle age. This week join Nancy for conversations with these two authors, plus a visit from Shane Weissman.

If your New Year's resolutions include dietary changes, author Jackie Day says a plant-based diet will transform your home, your diet, and you. Local author and meditation teacher Lani Muelrath also urges us to try a plant-based diet. This week join Nancy for a conversation with two vegan experts.

According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (or HUD), a household is defined as rent burdened when tenants pay more than 30 percent of their gross income on rent, and across California it’s pretty common. Data collected in 2016 by the U.S. Census Bureau showed a little over half of the households across California were experiencing rent burden, and 29 percent were experiencing severe rent burden, which means they were paying more than half of their income on rent.

Paradise writer T.E. Watson has made his reputation writing award-winning books for children, but he has written his latest book for would-be authors. This week join Nancy for tips on writings and publishing by the author of Light and Stone.

Eli Ennis is a leader and grandson of a chief of the Tla-o-qui-aht first nations tribe of Vancouver Island in British Columbia. His work as an educator and activist is featured in Gleb Raygorodetsky's book The Archipelago of Hope, which was featured on a previous episode. We dive deeper into how Ennis is leading a cooperative effort of land stewardship based both on science and traditional tribal practices.

The west coast of Canada is a rich maritime rainforest and fishery that is home to eagles, osprey, whales and salmon. And it is also very sensitive to climate change, which is altering the natural patterns that have existed along with humans, for thousands of years. It's a fascinating, hopeful and challenging discussion of balancing the needs of humans and nature. 

The latest book by librarian Nancy Leek is the story of the first American woman to come to California over the Sierra Nevada mountains. Author Teresa Jordan was selected to tell a story on the Moth Radio Hour recently. Her book is The Year of Living Virtuously. This week join Nancy for conversations with storytellers.

Editor's Note: We are re-posting this story, originally aired August 10, 2017, after the FCC voted today to repeal the so-called "net neutrality" rules that regulate businesses that connect consumers to the internet. You can read more about today's vote in this NPR story.

A recent vote by the federal government could bring real changes to anyone using a computer. The proposal would roll back net neutrality and create internet fast lanes for owners of websites willing to pay more. NSPR's Nolan Ford talked with consumer advocates, internet service providers and tech companies here in the North State about the potential impacts of new legislation.

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