Jennifer Jewell

Host, Cultivating Place

Jennifer Jewell is a professional garden writer and avid home gardener based in Northern California, where she lives and gardens with her husband, two daughters and two dogs. Her writing about gardens and gardeners around the world has been featured in Edible Shasta-Butte, Gardens Illustrated, House & Garden, Natural Home, Old House Journal, Colorado Homes & Lifestyles and mountainliving.com. She is a member of the Garden Writers Association. She is the host of Cultivating Place: Conversations on Natural History and the Human Impulse to Garden. That program, and more of Jennifer's work, can be found at Jewellgarden.com.

This week on Cultivating Place, we’re joined by Daniel Atkinson — teacher, student, scholar of the African American Diaspora and Jazz and Rhythm and Blues music and dedicated home gardener. Currently gardening in Puyallup, Wash., Daniel shares his thoughts on saving and sharing the seeds handed down to him by his ancestors — some of which have been in his family for more than 200 years. He also discusses the connection for him between music, surfing, gardening and life.  

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society

    

The first official day of spring is right around the corner, and among other things that means we're in the heart of flower and garden shows around the country.

This week, we speak with Sam Lemheney, Chief of Shows and Events for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which annually hosts the famed Philadelphia Flower Show. The longest-running horticultural event in the country (not counting Spring herself), the Philadelphia Flower Show is a pilgrimage destination for many horticulturists and gardeners around the country.

Panayoti Kelaidis

This week our guest is something of a renaissance man. A Colorado native of Greek descent, Panayoti Kelaidis has a background in Chinese literature and as a computer systems analyst in addition to being an expert in — and enthusiastically curious about — most things that photosynthesize and contain chlorophyll. 

Lorene Edwards Forkner

On Cultivating Place this week, we are energized by Lorene Edwards Forkner: award-winning garden designer, author, writer, Editor of the esteemed Pacific Horticulture magazine, mother and, above all, great lover of life, based in Seattle.

Dragged, as she likes to relate, into the garden by her lively young son many years ago, Lorene chats with us about the importance of gardens and horticulture in our individual and communal lives at this particular moment in time. She shares her experiences of how gardens help us to enjoy and embrace life’s inevitable seasons and sometimes its chaos. 

Julie Moir Messervy Design Studio

For more than 25 years, Julie Moir Messervy has inspired gardeners, readers and thinkers with her garden designs and her garden philosophy. She inspired host Jennifer Jewell years ago when she first read her book “The Inward Garden.”  In our interview we hear about her education as a gardener, her seminal work as a designer and some of her deeply held beliefs, including that “deep within each of us lies a garden.”

RD Fisher / Courtesy of Bernard Trainor

This week on Cultivating Place, the program’s conversations begin with Bernard Trainor, the Australian-born landscape designer. Known for his iconic California gardens, Trainor is both a hands-on gardener and a big view, large concept designer. His philosophy and work illustrate the power of specific place in any garden or cultivated landscape — no matter how big or small, urban or rural.

Jennifer Jewell

Thresholds are such interesting aspects of life, aren’t they? They’re important physical and metaphysical moments between this place and that place.

The winter solstice is now past and the New Year is upon us — iconic moments in time that come around again and again — each time reminding us how endings are so intimately intertwined with beginnings.

Jennifer Jewell

The annual choosing of garden books to carry me through the winter comes with such promise of pleasure. As girls, my sisters and I would be asked by our mother for a list of books we might like from Santa and we would diligently write down one or two. Without fail, she (Santa) would bestow those and at least one — maybe two? — more. It wasn’t until I was older that I realized that the additional titles were always based on a loving formula of the interests indicated from our original lists carefully warmed and expanded into larger (still unseen by us) hopes and dreams.

Jennifer Jewell

I am planting bulbs, culinary and ornamental. A heavy box of hope and spring dreams arrived from the heirloom bulb supplier Old House Gardens Heirloom Bulbs arrived last week, and they are now calling me to get them in the ground in the next few weeks. 

Brent Myers / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Each evening when I get home from work, I water my front, south-facing garden — a dry, rocky landscape which is cooked by the sun most of the day.

Almost every evening, I am kept company by two western fence lizards, one of which lives on the south side of a low stucco wall and the other of which lives on the north side.

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