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We talk with writer-director Jerry Miller and with members of his cast from the current production at Theatre on the Ridge in Paradise -- "Radioland's Fall Fantasia," a live radio-show-style variety show which features singing, comedy, a game show and festive celebrations of the autumn season. We also talk with Jacki McClain, Arts Coordinator for Taste of Chico this Sunday and the Chico Art Walk on October 6. McClain will tell how, as part of both those events, a group of artists has created wee Fairy Doors which will be hidden around downtown Chico and children are challenged to find them (prizes will be awarded to the children who locate the most fairy doors).

This is Since You Asked, where you ask the questions and we find the answers.

Today I’ll try to answer, “What’s safer, Highway 99 or 70?”

That’s a simple enough question, right? Or at least it seems so.

Retired biology professor Raymond Barnett has just finished his seventh book, The Death of Mycroft: Sherlock Holmes and the Secret of D-Day. This week join Nancy for a new Holmes mystery, and also the ancient Chinese way of living known as Taoism in Professor Barnett's previous book, Relax, You're Already Home.

Dave talks to Emer Reynolds, the director of the new documentary The Farthest, which aired on PBS Nova this summer. It tells the epic story of the twin Voyager spacecraft.

Launched in 1977, the Voyagers were the designed to tour the outer solar system thanks to an alignment that happens once in every 175 years. Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter and Saturn and then was flung into the outer solar system above the plane of the planets becoming the fastest object ever made by humans. In 2012, it entered interstellar space becoming, literally, the farthest.

Voyager 2 went on to explore Uranus and Neptune before also heading out toward the stars. Both carry the famous Golden Record, containing music, greetings and images — a time capsule of life on Earth sent to the stars. The records and the spacecraft will last a billion years, far outlasting any other human artifact. In the film, Reynolds interviews nearly every surviving member of the teams that engineered the missions, did the science and made the record.

Calre Cooper Marcus

  

The healing power of gardens and nature is well known to almost anyone who gardens and has been recorded by gardeners, landscape designers and medical practitioners as far back as antiquity. This week on Cultivating Place we’re joined by Dr. Clare Cooper Marcus, a leader in the field of evidence based research, education and design of what are alternatively known as healing gardens and therapeutic landscapes. Join us!

Photo used with the permission of California State University, Chico, Meriam Library Special Collections

Today we go “adventuring” with Mary Ellicott Arnold and her life partner, Mabel Reed, in the wilds of the Klamath and Salmon River country in 1908 and 1909. They worked as “field matrons” for the Department of the Interior’s United States Indian Service, an experience they generously share with us in In the Land of the Grasshopper Song, first published in 1955, which should top your must-read list. Their job was to “civilize” the Indians—the point being to take a kinder, gentler approach than clearly barbaric military action. Thanks to Annie Bidwell, Mary Arnold’s Chico cousin, they had met the special agent for California Indians, and asked to be sent to the roughest, toughest territory. He obliged.

Today our guest is Portland folk-rock songwriter Elizabeth Fagan, or as she’s known on stage, Lili St. Anne. Fagan has always been into music, but the idea of creating it herself was intimidating. It wasn’t until she was 20 years old and living alone in France that she began to obsessively write her own songs. The drama school she was attending at the time was highly competitive and exhausting. By the time she graduated, all she wanted to do was write and perform music. Several years and a couple of different bands later, Fagan is on the verge of releasing her debut album as Lili St. Anne.

We talk with three participants in the Chico music event "Small Town Big Sound III" which showcases local songwriter/performers, backing them up with an impressive 18-piece orchestra at Sierra Nevada Brewery's Big Room. We also talk with instructors from Chico's Blue Oak School which engages kids by using the arts to teach core subjects like math and language skills.

Most Californians know little of California's experience during the Civil War. Author Richard Hurley delved into the home front activities during the nation's bloodiest war, and chronicles the adventures of the brave men who fought far from home. This week join Nancy for a conversation with the author of California and the Civil War.

In the realm of gardenways and traditional garden design being inextricably interwoven with a culture, for me the garden design and techniques, and gardens associated with Japanese culture stand out. This week on Cultivating Place, we’re joined by Leslie Buck whose new book, “Cutting Back: My Apprenticeship in the Gardens of Kyoto,” recounts her experience during a three-month intensive apprenticeship with one of the most prestigious landscape and design firms in the storied city of Kyoto learning about her garden art form of aesthetic pruning, while at the same time learning much more about herself. Join us! 

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