Latest NPR News

Study after study has found that partisan beliefs and bias shape what we believe is factually true.

A senior FBI official who has come under fire for sending politically charged text messages while working on the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Trump-Russia probe has been escorted out of the FBI building.

Read More News From NPR

In this episode we talk defense. Planetary defense. From one of the worst of all possible natural diasters, an asteroid impact. Dave talks to Lindley Johnson, NASA's "Planetary Defense Officer" from HQ in Washington, Paul Chodas (an expert on calculating asteroid orbits) and Physicist Megan Bruck Syal from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in Pasadena. Johnson and Syal are involved in HAMMER ( Hypervelocity Asteroid Mitigation Mission for Emergency Response), a mission designed to actually deflect an asteroid on a collision course with Earth. One thing that all of our guests mentioned: "This isn't like the movie Armageddon" and while we get that, we also felt the need for a little Aerosmith in the show, and you don't want to miss a thing...so listen and enjoy while contemplating the worst of all possible natural calamities.

PETER SIMS / Flickr, Creative Commons

“Hello, this is Lupe Green. I’m calling from Tehama County, California and my question is how is the issue of water resources for the North State being addressed? I am concerned about the availability of water in the North State over time, given climate change, droughts, increased acres of orchards, and water demands from the southern part of the state. Will the many individual water wells run dry?”

The northern Sacramento Valley is lined with walnut orchards, almond orchards and the communities we call home. All of this takes water, and a lot of it. If you rely on a well, then Lupe is right, there are a number of things that you should be concerned about; especially in an ever changing political and environmental climate. 

 

The second best time to become a gardener and nature lover is right now.  The first best time, is as a child. This week on Cultivating Place, we’re joined by Nora McDonald and Katherine Somerville of the American Horticultural Society and by Fiona Doherty of Cornell University’s Horticulture Department and Garden Education. They talk with us about the history, impact of hopes of the American Horticultural Society’s Children & Youth Garden Symposium. This year’s symposium is being held in July at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Join us! 

 

Tom Hilton

Another great place to taste Southern California’s amazing desert is 1.6-million- acre Mojave National Preserve, bordered by I-40 in the south and I-15 in the north, stretching east from Baker to Highway 95 and Nevada near Nipton.

(To seriously digress: Nipton is an 80-acre mining town bought last year for $5 million, by American Green, to make into a marijuana mecca. You know, “buds ’n’ breakfast,” an adults-only destination. But cash was short, so in February 2018 Delta International Oil & Gas bought the joint. Pot-themed resort plans won’t go up in smoke, folks say, but some worry about drilling in and around Nipton’s deep- water aquifer. Get the latest when you go.)

Anyway: This sublime slice of desert delimited by freeways is affectionately known as “The Lonesome Triangle”—just look at a map—though it was lonesome out here long before there were freeways.

When former grant writer Mary K. Jensen traveled the world with her husband Rudy, he had a rule for every situation. She has written these down in a memoir, Rudy's Rules for Travel: Life Lessons from Around the Globe. This week join Nancy for a conversation about how a marriage of opposites survived world travel.

We visit Old City Hall in Redding where Axiom Repertory Theatre is presenting the play "W;t." It's a dark comedy about a a woman who, with resolve and lots of humor, faces the final weeks of her life. We talk with the director and cast. We also talk with Reta Rickmers, art teacher at Chico's Pleasant Valley High, about how her students creatively use recycled materials of many types to create wearable art which they'll be showing off in a unique fashion show. caption: Reta Rickmers and some of her art students.

Photo used courtesy of Vincent Bellino

Happy California Native Plant Week! The California Floristic Province is home to on the order of 6,500 native plant species and there are those among us who love and want to ensure the long life of the genetics and habitats of every single one. Today, in celebration of California Native Plant Week, we’re hearing from a selection of those voices, including Native Plant Home Gardener Vincent Bellino. Join us!

Chico author Jan Condon writes books introducing children to the existence of gut flora. Paradise author David Lemmo wrote and illustrated a book of Frankenstein stories. This weekend he will be participating in the bicentennial of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein at the San Diego Comic Fest. This week join Nancy for conversations with two authors of children's books.

We talk with filmmaker and master of stop-motion animation Josh Funk whose short fantasy-horror movie "3 Keys"is having a world-premiere at MoNCA, the Museum of Northern California Art. We also talk with writers, directors and actors from the OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute) Play Festival, a collection of original short comedies performing at Chico's Blue Room Theatre.

In this episode of Blue Dot, Dave talks to Jennifer Strauss from the UC Berkeley Seismology Lab and Ken Hudnut from the United States Geological Survey. Both are deeply involved in the April 18, 2018 roll out of the "Haywired Scenario" a scientifically accurate modeling of a Magnitude 6.8 earthquake on the Hayward Fault. Our conversation revolves around the new technology called Shake Alert. Using seismic monitoring all over the state (especially in quake prone areas such as the Bay area and Southern California), scientists have developed a system to use the early arrival seismic waves, p-waves, to alert us to the imminent shaking that will follow in a matter of seconds. The early warning system can be used on computers and smart phones to let us know how long we have to brace for the hard shaking of a major earthquake. The system will also be used by transportation systems like BART and utility systems like PG&E to best safeguard our infrastructure when the next "Big One" inevitably hits somewhere in California.

Pages

With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects.

There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

PSAs & Events

Community Calendar

Submit your organization's event to our new Community Calendar.