Latest NPR News

It's been quite a news week, even by recent standards.

The U.S. is potentially hours away from a partial government shutdown. The debate rages on over the president's reported comments about not wanting to accept immigrants from "s**thole countries." "Girtherism" has erupted over the president's latest height and weight measurements. Officials are scrambling to figure out how to avoid another false ballistic missile alarm, like the one residents of Hawaii suffered last weekend.

The Hotel California was, according to a case filed against it by legendary rock band The Eagles, living it up a little too much. The rock band sued the Mexico-based hotel, which shares a name with the band's iconic 1976 song, resulting in a settlement Thursday. The settlement's terms were not disclosed.

Read More News From NPR
Jan Arendtsz

We look to the center this week, California’s great Central Valley, where hundreds of thousands of waterfowl, shorebirds, and even songbirds stop to rest and eat on their way south for the winter. After summer’s breeding and chick-rearing season in and near the Arctic, migrants stream south via the continent’s Pacific Flyway, most becoming Californians for at least a short while. Which is why bird events such as January’s Snow Goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway are so immensely popular. How many people get to witness this great migration, year after year, up close and personal? Not many. What a privilege to be right here, year after year.

Photo courtesy of Cycle for Sjögren's

An annual charity ride that takes place in Chico, California dedicated to raising awareness, community support, education and research towards Sjögren's Syndrome. The event has a family-friendly 5-mile ride and a longer 30-mile ride for more advanced cyclists. Learn more at www.cycleforsjogrens.com.

Lacking lures found elsewhere, the North State has long viewed itself as distinct. A sort of under-the-radar California. Sure, our surf breaks are behind boats, and we lack movie moguls and high-tech business parks, but we’re not choking on traffic, and most are winning the struggle to keep a roof over their head. Though some of that may be changing.

According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (or HUD), a household is defined as rent burdened when tenants pay more than 30 percent of their gross income on rent, and across California it’s pretty common. Data collected in 2016 by the U.S. Census Bureau showed a little over half of the households across California were experiencing rent burden, and 29 percent were experiencing severe rent burden, which means they were paying more than half of their income on rent.

Suzi Rosenberg / Flickr

As rent prices rise across California, many struggle to find safe and affordable housing. But students face additional difficulties when they come to a new town, have little rental history and the additional burden of paying for their education.  

For Chico State students on a budget, affordable housing exists, but it often comes with other costs. Finding a cheap place to rent often means having more roommates than you’d prefer, signing a fixed-term lease, or living in a location that isn’t ideal.

Agriculture is a major industry in a number of counties in the North State. In Yuba, Sutter, Glenn, Colusa and Butte counties agriculture brings in millions of dollars each year, as well as thousands of migrant and seasonal workers. But while the industry is a huge boon for the North State’s economy, it often struggles to sustain those arriving to help bring in the harvest. Rosa and Jesus Vargas are a young Orland couple, both in their 20s, who are building their lives together, in part, on farmworker wages.

Musical theatre songwriters Benj Pasek & Justin Paul have had quite a year, winning an Oscar for "La La Land" and a Tony for "Dear Evan Hansen." They've rounded out the year with the live TV broadcast of their show "A Christmas Story the Musical" and the release of their new original movie-musical "The Greatest Showman." We'll sample songs from all those shows/films as we celebrate Pasek & Paul.

Paradise writer T.E. Watson has made his reputation writing award-winning books for children, but he has written his latest book for would-be authors. This week join Nancy for tips on writings and publishing by the author of Light and Stone.

Eli Ennis is a leader and grandson of a chief of the Tla-o-qui-aht first nations tribe of Vancouver Island in British Columbia. His work as an educator and activist is featured in Gleb Raygorodetsky's book The Archipelago of Hope, which was featured on a previous episode. We dive deeper into how Ennis is leading a cooperative effort of land stewardship based both on science and traditional tribal practices.

The west coast of Canada is a rich maritime rainforest and fishery that is home to eagles, osprey, whales and salmon. And it is also very sensitive to climate change, which is altering the natural patterns that have existed along with humans, for thousands of years. It's a fascinating, hopeful and challenging discussion of balancing the needs of humans and nature. 

This week on Cultivating Place, a lesson in garden history seen through the lens of holiday decorations and traditions from seasons past when we’re joined by Laura Viancor, head of horticulture at historic Colonial Williamsburg in Williamsburg, Virginia. Join us for the greens and other festive things. Happy holidays.

Pages

With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects. Co-produced by Nolan Ford, Nancy's Bookshelf airs Fridays from 10 to 11 a.m.

PSAs & Events

Community Calendar

Submit your organization's event to our new Community Calendar.