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The partial shutdown of the federal government has stretched into a third day, as discussions continue on a funding and immigration plan.

Lawmakers said Sunday they made progress on an agreement to end the shutdown, but did not reach a final deal. Senate leaders scheduled a procedural vote for noon on Monday on a bill to reopen the government and extend funding through Feb. 8.

Ask Republicans about Democrats, or vice versa, and sooner or later you will hear: "They're out of touch with the American people."

That statement was part of the soundtrack on Capitol Hill over the first weekend of the shutdown, repeated so often that one ceases to hear it.

It's an all-purpose way of condemning the hated "other" party. And it conveys the assumption that whoever is speaking is NOT out of touch with the American people.

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When Nimco Ali was 7, she thought her family was going on vacation. They flew from their hometown in Manchester, England, to Djibouti on the Horn of Africa.

Ali doesn't remember the exact location. But she clearly remembers what happened there.

The young girl found herself in a dingy room, with a woman dressed in all black, standing over her. She didn't know what was going on at the time. But she fell asleep. And when Ali woke up, she was confused.

The woman had mutilated her genitals.

Following an industry trend, Gannett announced on Tuesday that it intends to split its company in two. One half will handle the newspapers and the other its broadcasting and digital operations.

The AP reports:

After nearly a month of fighting, a negotiated, three-day peace has taken hold in Gaza.

As NPR's Emily Harris reports, Israel has also ordered all of its troops out of Gaza. But this may not mean the end of the current conflict, because the Israel Defense Forces said its troops would maintain a defensive position and respond to any attacks.

Case in point: By morning just before the truce started, Emily said she heard rocket fire out of Gaza. But things have calmed down and the AP reports that in Gaza "traffic picked up and shops started opening doors."

A senior minister in the British government's foreign office tendered her resignation on Tuesday, protesting what she said was the U.K. government's "morally indefensible" position on the conflict in Gaza.

Sayeeda Warsi, a baroness with a seat in the House of Lords who became the first Muslim member of the prime minister's cabinet, is opposed to Britain's strong support of Israel.

In this episode of Edible North State, Earl Bloor talks about fracking with Wolfgang Frugel, a UC Davis grad who now works at an organic farm near Cottonwood.

Oroville resident Pamela Saraga started writing after retiring from working 37 years for the US Postal Service. For a year she wrote for the column "North State Voices" in the Oroville Mercury Register. Her novel Amazon Diet is about a group of overweight women who decide to take an adventure vacation in Suriname to have fun and lose some weight.

Alexa Benson-Valavanis is president and CEO of a philanthropic foundation based in Chico. When she was 25, she was making plans to enter a Buddhist monastery in Nova Scotia when a encounter with a stranger resulted in an invitation to work in Shanghai, China. In a three-year journey from Shanghai to Hong Kong, Guatemala to Vietnam, Alexa struggled to reconcile her sexuality with her longing for a relationship with God.

On this episode of The Practical Gardener, Pam Geisel talks about winter and fall vegetables.  

Maralee Wofford (pen name Maralee Lowder) writes novels about the Old Mortuary in Dunsmuir, California which has converted into an inn. The building is thought to be haunted and ghosts have been seen there. 

When local author David Allee lived in Hawaii, he heard of haunted places there and has written a historical novel based on what he learned.

On this episode of The Practical Gardener, Pam Geisel answers a listener question about how to achieve worm-free apples.

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With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects. Co-produced by Nolan Ford, Nancy's Bookshelf airs Fridays from 10 to 11 a.m.

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